Sunday Talks

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In the last of our Miscellany September Theme, Rev. Chris Terry talks about God.

The final week of the Gospel of Thomas. Chris explores her favorite of the Thomas sayings, and wraps up the series with a powerful prayer.

To borrow a quote from TS Eliot, “Put first things first and we get second things thrown in; put second things first and we lose both first and second things.” See What the Gospel of Thomas says about keeping spirituality primary in our lives and what possibilities come of it when we do.

Week two of the Gospel of Thomas, in which Rev Marsha illuminates the difference between gnocchi and gnosis. Very helpful!

We begin our month’s theme of “Where Humanity and Divinity Meet: The Gospel of Thomas”. Chris explores the history of Christianity from the perspective of its multiplicity, and illuminates the VERY different view of Jesus that Thomas presents.

Metaphysician Ernest Holmes said the world has learned all it can through suffering; modern day researcher Brene Brown says we humans are built for struggle. How do we find middle ground in this seeming dichotomy and move forward so that we can stand in right relationship to our humanness? Chris shares the wisdom she learned in Alcoholics Anonymous and in the Science of Mind & Spirit to come to a practical and positive understanding of how to live in the balance.

Forgiveness is fine for the smaller things in life, but how do you forgive the unforgivable–the most horrific and unthinkable acts that can’t possibly be forgiven? David Blakey tells how he walked through a heart-wrenching story of friendship, suffering, hardship and being there because it’s the right thing to do. He describes the heartbreak of a friend as her mother is dying of cancer, and that mother having to attend her daughter’s funeral. What do you do when there’s no one else to do the hard things in life? David’s talk describes showing up and doing the next right thing that was in front of him because there was no one else who could. The story takes him through his own process of grief, anger and ultimately, forgiveness.

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